Northern Zone

Located one kilometre to the north of the SREZ, the Northern Zone represents a large exploration target for rare earths in its own right, with mineralisation identified over a 1km x 1km area. 

The Northern Zone rare earth mineralisation contains a higher proportion of Critical rare earths than the SREZ. It is also highly prospective for niobium – tantalum and phosphate discovered from two exploration reconnaissance drill traverses carried out in 2011. Additional drilling is planned to define an initial resource for this second style of mineralisation at Ngualla. Currently the Northern Zone is not included in the maiden rare earth Mineral Resource for Ngualla. The best results to date include:

Rare Earth Oxides:

Drill Hole Intersection
NRC121: 52m at 1.33% REO from 20m
NRC133: 14m at 1.41% REO from surface and
48m at 1.33% REO from 18m
NRC140: 66m at 1.56% REO from 10m and
16m at 1.35% REO from 80m
  REO = total rare earth oxide including yttrium.
Plan of Northern Zone rare earth intersection highlights (drill hole numbers labelled) outside of the Mineral Resource area and drilling completed to date, maximum down hole REO% contours.

Niobium - Tantalum:

In addition to rare earths, the Northern Zone is also highly prospective for niobium – tantalum and phosphate mineralisation that is broadly coincident with the rare earths, surrounding the Southern Rare Earth Zone mineralisation on Ngualla Hill and extending northwards into the Northern Zone within karstic infill sediments and deeply weathered carbonatite bedrock. Better intersections from two reconnaissance drill traverses completed to date include:

Drill Hole Intersection
NRC125: 24m at 1.12% Nb2O5 and 226ppm Ta2O5 from 4m
NRC138: 14m at 1.17% Nb2O5 and 364ppm Ta2O5 from 30m
NRC140: 119m at 0.71% Nb2O5 and 162ppm Ta2O5 from surface to EOH including:
18m at 1.16% Nb2O5 and 266ppm Ta2O5 from surface and
22m at 1.32% Nb2O5 and 206ppm Ta2O5 from 50m

Plan view of maximum down hole Nb2O5 in the Southern Rare Earth and Northern Zones of the Ngualla Carbonatite showing new niobium – tantalum intersections highlights. Mineralisation remains open to the north, south and west.

 

Niobium and Tantalum

Almost two thirds of the world’s requirement for tantalum is consumed by the electronics industry. Tantalum-based components are in demand in the armament industry, the aerospace industry, in the construction of artificial limbs, joints, and bones, and for equipment and control units in medicine. They are also needed for highly corrosion-resistant parts.

The metal niobium is used in the manufacture of high performance alloys. Such alloys are used in the production of turbines, thrust bearings, high-speed bearings, combustion chambers, superconductors, pressure-resistant and heat-resistant parts as well as all types of wear-resistant components.

 

Phosphate:

Drill Hole Intersection
NRC121: 64m at 19.7% phosphate from 10m
NRC140: 12m at 21.3% phosphate from 2m and
43m at 20.2% phosphate from 76m
NRC154: 58m at 21.1% phosphate from 4m

There is considerable potential to extend the rare earth mineralisation significantly in most directions in the Northern Zone, and also to locate higher-grade zones of rare earth mineralisation than have been identified in this area to date. The rare earth potential at Ngualla remains the Company’s primary focus but the additional niobium-tantalum and phosphate mineralisation may add significant potential value to the project.

Further RC drilling is planned in the Northern Zone to define a maiden Inferred Mineral Resource for this second style of mineralisation at Ngualla. This is the first step towards developing a pipeline of additional commodities to add further value to the Project in addition to the rare earth development.


Plan view of maximum down hole phosphate in the Southern Rare Earth and Northern Zones of the Ngualla Carbonatite showing new phosphate intersections highlights. Mineralisation remains open to the north, south and west.

Location

Peak Resources Ground Floor,
5 Ord Street, West Perth,
Western Australia.

Subscribe to Peak: